Skip to main content

About your Search

20121201
20121231
STATION
CSPAN 21
CSPAN2 7
MSNBCW 5
CNBC 3
CNNW 3
WBAL (NBC) 3
FBC 2
WRC (NBC) 2
WUSA (CBS) 2
CNN 1
LANGUAGE
English 62
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 62 (some duplicates have been removed)
of 8 months to the next federal election in germany, for instance. greece therefore is the sick person europe. of the world. meanwhile, the united states of america is ungovernable. you have a system in this country that was created to create this country as an ungovernable state. you have congress, the president canceling each other out. how the president -- whoever the president might be -- do anything? you have china -- finding it impossible to provide a replacement for the demand that the west has done away with. so, i do not have an answer for your question. bewilderment. >> my question is about consumer demand and the extent to which the old system depended on it. if we do not have it to the same degree, could there possibly be a new economy? i cannot know how to say all of these in the right economic terms. i will say what i am thinking and see what you make out of it. its teams like all the economy's got to a point where it had to be based on growth. it could not just be sustainable. it had to grow. and that meant more consumers. so, then, that led to a lot of things ecological
. greece unveiling that $10 billion eurobond buyback. a 52-week high in france and germany. our road map this morning begins in washington where fiscal cliff negotiations according to the "times" has "collapsed." at least for now. with less than a month until the deadline, who blinks first if anyone? >> goldman takes dell from a strength to a buy. is it time to look at the stock and maybe even other players in the beat up personal computer sector? >> manufacturing data out of china. not bad. 50.6. that's the highest in seven months. although shanghai again trades lower even europe's pmi improves a touch in november. first up, we're one month away from the fiscal cliff and so far the white house and congressional republicans are still in disagreement over how to reduce the deficit and avoid a raft of tax hikes and spending cuts. yesterday our own jim cramer and maria bartiromo were on "meet the press" and cramer had a message for fellow panelists and father of the anti-tax pledge, grover norquist. >> most ceos are republican. they're on board. they're not on board with you. they're not on
this administration. we have to reduce spending. we are heading down the same path that greece did. right now the democrats are talking about raising taxes on the top 2%. if we do not stop the spending, we will be back here again maybe one year from now saying, maybe we need to raise taxes on the top 25% or 50%. then everybody will be taxed and we will run out of money. what is going to happen is the federal government is not going to be able to take care of its obligations. you are not going to be able to have safety nets. social security and medicare are going broke. we have to fix those of those who are dependent on those systems can get them. continuing to spend money like both parties have been doing the, wild spending is going to lead us to be just like greece. we are not going to be able to take care of the poor or the needy or take care of senior citizens. we have to stop spending. host: this is fiscal year 2010, but it has not changed significantly in terms of percentage. 41% of the federal budget. not defense appropriations 19%. defense spending 20%. the national debt 6%. we're in t
the country from becoming greece but i'm not going to set aside the 1.2 trillion in cuts. any hope of going over the fiscal cliff must start in the senate. not one democrat would support the idea that we could protect 99% of americans from a tax increase. boehner's plan b i thought made as soon as. to my republican kcolleagues, te the ronald reagan model is if you get 80% of what you want, that's a good day. i lime simpson-bowles. the president is going to get tax rate hikes. to my republican colleagues, if we can protect 99% of the public from a tax hike that, is not a tax increase in my book. chuck, maybe you and me and some other people in the senate can find a way to find this on the short term but on the long term there's not going to be a deal any time soon. >> you think we're going to go over the cliff? >> i think we're going to fall out of the fiscal tree. the big chance at the big deal is at the debt ceiling. that's when we'll have leverage to turn the country around, prevent from becoming greece and save social security and medicare. to anybody listening, i will raise the debt cei
or the interests of the nobles should govern the affairs of men since these questions convulsed greece and rome. he was looking back at greece and rome in the way we look back at the founding to try to figure out how much of this division, how much of the divided opinion is natural, how much is unnatural, and how do you manage and try to do what you can with what we have. and his answer, wonderfully, was in theory he would want to go back to monticello. you know those wonderful quotations, we all know them. oh, if i could only be with my books and at my farm and at my family in the peace and respite of possibility cello. well, you know, the road was open. he could have gone. new york, philadelphia, williamsburg, richmond, paris, london, hold and, i mean, he was everywhere the action was. he was irresistibly drawn to it. because as a young man he'd entered into what he called the bold and doubtful election between submission and the sword. the american revolution shaped him and grabbed him in the way few historical events, i think, have grabbed any generation or any man. i think he thought of the re
starred in "greece" they release add new video for their song called "i think you might like it." that's your eye on entertainment. tesa
continues on. tom, likely they will get less. the pensions in greece were guaranteed by the government, ma were cut as much as 35%. so, when you have government intervene shin in whainterventia private market enterprise, the public get hurt. like all of these safety net programs, the entitlement programs, once the seed is planted, they are almost impossible to get rid of, and left with a multibillion dollar deficit like in this case. tom: fha, we got into the mortgage mess because people had no skin in the game to a greatic tent, no money down, little money down, 1% be 3%, that is what the fha is still doing, making loans with almost no money down. why do you not expect a problem? >> we have got a problem. in my opinion, we got into housing crisis because of government, and as the administration takes laps about their successful bailout of general motors, that we lost billions of dollars o as taxpayers, we still have fharc, ha and fannie and freddie. tom: it is both of them are amazing. when it comes to fha, how -- this could take years to work this without, like you said, fannie and fredd
rather than contraction. it's been since october of last year. also abroad greece announcing it will buy back bonds through a dutch auction. the set up whether allow athenss to assess the level of demand before setting a final bryce for the deal. part of the country's efforts to cut its about a along debt. and in germany, merkel is not ruling out the possibility of notifying greece some of its debt once athens finances are in better shape. angela merkel told a german tabloid that the question of the so-called haircut can be revisited. in the past, merkel's government had ruled out forgiving any debt. >> in corporate new, ubs is reportedly close to a settlement. the "new york times" says the swiss bank is expected to pay horn $450 million over claims that some of its employees submitted false libor rates. that's pretty huge story and we will take a look and ten to see what happens with this. also morgan stanley trader is under investigation by cme regulators over trades and treasury futures four years ago. at the time he was employed by goldman sachs. he's now head of global interest rate
your retirement, have brought us to the brink of becoming greece, the people that are stealing from their children and breaking open their piggy banks, how can they call people who pay half of the taxes greedy? they're the ones that are agreey, they're the ones that are selfish, and they're the ones that have spent beyond their means. you rarely hear that. why is that? the left controls most media outlets in the country and they define compassion and generosity by spending other people's money. this is a selfish, massive power grab and this is done by greedy politicians, you know, the ones that claim they care about you as they crat -- as they create d see, there are 18 mor million me americans on food stamps. 50 million americans in total on food stampletion. one in six americans live in poverty, millions more living paycheck to paycheck. i suspect with all the government compassion, i believe people would rather live debt-free. there's a lot of good time spending their money and then blaming the people who are giving them the money. if we're going to save america, we've got to rec
of the nobles should govern the affairs of men. she was looking back to greece and rome and the founding to figure out to figure out how much of the divided opinion as natural, how much is on natural and how do you manage and try to do what you can with what we have in his answer was in theory he would want to go back to monticello. you know those wonderful quotations. we all know them. if i could only be with my books and my farm and my family and at peace and rest of monticello. well, you know the road was open, she could have gone in new york, philadelphia, richmond, paris, london, holland. he was everywhere the action was. he was irresistibly drawn to it because it has a young man he entered into what he called the board election between submission and the sword. the american revolution shaped him and grabbed him in the way that few historical defense i think have grabbed any generation or any man. i think that he thought of the revolution actually almost as an organic thing almost as a child than as an adopted or created by this group of men who would preserve it and make it and nur
such as greece and portugals of the world, and you get 65 percent or 70 percent debt to g.d.p., it is a red flag and 95 95 percent, that is a problem but our number will be so gigantic it is hard to understand how question have a vibrant economy when we pay $1 trillion a year in interest. >>neil: the markets seem to fall the lack thereof of the talks. is that a sign they are worried? >>guest: the market is worried the market wants closure of the debt ceiling. they do nut want this part of negotiations. we saw what happened last year, disaster. whatever deal is cut, the most important thing for wall street is the debt ceiling debate goes away for a year or month. >>neil: i think speaker boehner speaking to reporters today on what his plans were, i want you to react. >> tomorrow the house will pass legislation to make permanent tax relief for nearly every american and the president will have a decision to make. he can call on senate democrats to pass that bill. or he can be responding for the largest tax increase in american history. >>neil: is this his way of saying, it is in your cart. >>guest:
, including the tax rate hike though i don't like them to get, to save the country from becoming greece. i'm not going to set aside the $1.2 trillion in cuts. >> if the president does return to washington this week, unclear whether he will come back here to hawaii for new year's with his family. joe lieberman says he expects the senate to be in session on new year's eve, working on a deal down to the wire. >> thank you, ed. markets dropped on shortened day of trading. dow fell 52. s&p 500 lost 3.5. nasdaq down 8.5. might be a blue christmas for retailers. shoppers came out in droves but spent less this holiday season. however, sales are way up for those selling american made goods. correspondent william la jeunesse has the latest on the push for red, white, blue products. >> i sign trade agreements that help the companies sell more goods to millions of new customers. goods stamped with three proud words. "made in america." >> while it's true abroad that the u.s. products have a reputation for quality, getting americans to believe is it a challenge for retailers. >> nation that doesn't make
german newspapers have started comparing the u.s. to greece. i've got to tell you, that's not really the fairest of comparisons. for the record, the headline in the post was, the rest of the world thinks the fiscal cliff is ridiculous. i think a lot of people here would agree with that headline. >> it's interesting -- i heard a report about it calling it slow, too, that it would take effect gradually. let's just get it done. >>> bright but brisk today and cold again tonight. >> will it get milder? a big football game for this region coming up this weekend. howard will have the answer when we return. two big football games in fact. your weather coming up after this gorgeous shot of the sunrise. keep it here. >>> welcome back to 9news. monika here with your timesaver traffic. you'll want to listen up for sure if you're headed to the beltway north of town in bethesda. i'll explain what's been going on since 2:00 this morning. on the outer loop you're looking at a truck that had overturned just past the exit for northbound i-270. maryland state police tell me he admitted he was going too
not become greece? it is interesting that we talked about the fiscal coordination have in the countries and to last come along and bail them out when they have not done what they're supposed to do? i do not know that we are that much different. we have a great panel. people thought are far smarter than i am. i will introduce them now. and then i will sit down and i did ask some questions to revival at the panel to keep their answers relatively short so we can run through a lot of questions and get out of here on time. we have ailson frasier, director of the institute for economic studies at the heritage foundation. as director, she oversees the heritage foundation research on a wide range of domestic, economic issues, including federal spending, taxes, the debt and deficit. before joining heritage in 2003, she was deputy director of the oklahoma office of state finance where she worked for governor. next, rudy penner, the institute fellow and the rj and francis miller chair in public policy at the urban institute. prior to that in his long career, he was director of the congressional bu
been doing is going to lead us to being just like greece. we will not be able to take care of the poor and needy or senior citizens. we've got to stop spending. host: this is from the congressional budget office -- social security, medicare, and medicaid are 41% of the federal budget. defense spending is 20% area do you cut? >> we have to cut across the whole circle. it is not the so-called congress' spending. it is everything in that pie plate. need to fix social security and medicare because they are going broke. democratic colleagues are totally in denial. they think they have a policy regarding social security and medicare. they say denied it is a problem and they deny -- and a delay fixing it and third, they will destroy the programs because they are denying and delighting and they are demonizing those of us who want to try to fix it. we need to fix it so that social security and medicare are available for those people needed. we've got to put in place policies that will do so. the democrats have been totally against are doing so. host: are you worried that the republicans are jus
can think of is greece. host: what does it mean for the pentagon? guest: greece used to be one of the only three non-u.s. countries in nato that was spending to% of gdp on national security. -- 2% of gdp on national security. they are now below that because it cannot afford it. host: democratic caller, new jersey. caller: i am a retired attorney colonel. i've done a lot of research on the federal budget. whenever we start talking about social security and medicare, the entitlements, and relating it to the annual budget deficit, we're making a mistake. it has no part today in a problem. the spending increases for the war and other things that we basically did not fund, the huge loss in employment in 2007 and 2008 were people stopped paying taxes and started drawing welfare, and number three, we have the tax cuts, the bush tax cuts and the obama tax cuts which have severely reduced the amount of revenue. the tax burden on americans from the federal government today is an 80-year low. we cannot fund the government with the revenues and loss in jobs that we have. host: cbo has done
at the pace it has been growing. we do have an advantage that greece does not have. we print the world's money. we cannot expect the dollar will be keen to tomorrow. -- forever. if the europeans can manage their deficit and we cannot, the world will switch to euros. there is a tweet here -- guest: the cbo is supposed to be a political, but it cannot be too alarmist. if we go over the cliff, we are looking on january 1, some of this is already milton. about $600 million -- $650 billion in spending cuts and tax increases. that is about 4% of gdp. that is an enormous negative stimulus. a detraction from demand. that would surely be a deep recession. the cbo relies on simulation models that did not take into consideration investor sentiment, the reaction of consumers, and so forth that they wholly lose confidence in their government. if we go over the cliff and stay there, people will start to conclude that washington cannot manage its affairs. all bets are off on economic modeling. it is impossible to say what happened that other than it would be very negative. host: one piece that you actually d
that this country could become like greece. do you see that as a possibility? >> no, i do not see that as a -- i do not see us becoming a light breeze. it is a profoundly different situation. i do see the possibility that we could have the debt that could truly be harmful. the congressional budget office, which is nonpartisan, says if we stay on the course we are on, we'll have a debt that is 230% of our gdp over the next 20 years. most of the experts say that once you get a debt over 90% of your gross domestic product, that inhibit future economic growth. and in a pretty significant way. this is not just about numbers. it is about opportunities for people. whether you'll be able to send your kid to school, send them to college, whether they will be able to buy a car, buy a house. are you going to be able to start a business and have it succeed? whether or not you have economic opportunity for the people of the country. and we know with the best academic research that has been done that if a country's debt gets too large in relationship to the size of its economy, the economy does not grow as fast.
, but which is what is going on in greece and spain and portugal. it leads to these unemployment rates of 20% in some of these countries. host: mr. bivens? guest: that is not what caused the debt in those countries. spain had a lower gdp debt ratio than we did. i think it shows they do not have an independent monetary policy. they cannot have an independent central bank that just prints money the way that we do. i think it is the un-wisdom of the currency union. there is no evidence that countries with bigger welfare states are in bigger trouble. with the previous caller, i totally agree. the skills of workers more unemployed is not much of to an employers. if there is was this unmet demand for skilled workers out there and employees had openings but there were not the right people, you would see wages spiking in all sorts of occupations. i do not see wages spiking in any sector of the economy right now. the idea that there is this diagnosis that, it is too bad you people are not employed, you people do not have the right skills, there is no evidence that is going on. host: jim on the republ
the world markets are watching and america may be on the verge of a disaster bigger than greece. senator shelby republican from alabama joins us live. thank you for coming in today. >> thank you. >> shannon: what do you make of where we are right now? because, you know, to hear that the treasury secretary went to the hill with the white house with the president's proposal and that republicans actually laughed because they didn't say it was believable, it sounds like we are nowhere. >> i think the real impasse. the clock is ticking. this is december. and we know what happens on december 31. but i believe the president is going to have to meet us at least halfway. if we could do this, we could do a lot of things. i think that speaker boehner, senator mcconnell want to do something. if the president is determined to have more taxes. more spending. and cuts later, that is not going to work with the republicans. if so, i hope we won't blink at the end of the day. >> shannon: i want to play a sound bite from a colleague, senator lindsey graham from south carolina. here is where he said about w
of vessels and other military aid to other countries so this particular vessel went to greece and was their number one vessel for longtime and until about 1991 when the greek government decided they no longer needed this vessel within a very short period of time, the destroyer escort sailors association raised $300,000 to have it towed back to america. it was housed for a short time at the interested air and space museum in new york city. when they no longer had room for it they had to search for a new home but mayor jennings who is mayor of the city in albany felt this would be a wonderful attraction on the waterfront which he was trying to revitalize at the time and now it is the only destroyer escort still afloat in america in its original world war ii configuration. this is the kind of thing that allows people to see what it was like back then. what happened and how valiant the sailors were who served aboard these vessels. it is remarkable testimony to the bravery in those days. >> now more from albany, new york with the help of time warner cable, we look at one of the ori
this morning. i had no idea -- i had no idea it was an immigrant company. >> you thought it was from greece. [laughter] >> exactly, you know. i had no idea. these google -- all of these companies which maybe it needs to be a marketing campaign. i don't know. but something i think should be done to change the image of immigrants and make it more positive, and i think that will facilitate everything we're talking about today. so how do you guys think we can maybe change that image of immigrants and make it more positive and not make everybody, when they think of immigrants think of border wars on history channel. >> well, at different times and places, immigrants have been viewed more or less favorably in the united states. this is a nation of immigrants. but when immigration was largely cut off during the 1920's, a lot of americans became somewhat estranged from the immigrant roots of their forebearers. and lost a sense that we were a nation of immigrants. but in some parts of the country today you see the enormous economic vitality it comes with a really diverse and active population that a
farm in maine that helps turn greece into finding peace. >> i know when chris died, we kept thinking about how we were going to remember him. and we kept thinking that his spirit was moving through the trees every time you saw them moving. i seem to be drawn to maine even though i've never lived here. it's pretty amazing. >> we're in the wreath business and have been since 1971. columbia falls is a little town in coastal washington county. the perfect little country town kind of thing. we're looking for 12 to 18-inch pieces. as fast as this brush is coming in, we're using it on the other end. we're out on the land that produces the tips for national wreaths across america day. >> each wreath is made of balsam that is picked off of our own land. it began as a family tradition to donate 5,000 wreaths to arlington national cemetery. >> a great source of pride for my family. it's our little way of giving back to the country is through the veterans wreaths program and the new veterans remembers trees program. >> that's captain brent morale, u.s. marine corps. this is another tree has been
rate increases, maybe not at 250, but upper rate americans. we accomplished little in not become greece. this won't affect the debt situation. it will be a political victory for the president and i hope we have the courage of what we believe is republicans. hats off to the president, he won. >> reporter: democrats would acknowledge this deal, if there is a deal is smaller in scope and won't do as much for reducing the deficit long term as both sides hoped. the real focus is to focus the most harm on people. not having everyone's taxes going up. there's a lot more involved in it. we have been focused on taxes. we hope to have something that gives a sense of are they close? will they get there? within a couple hours. >> a couple hours. we'll check in with you again. thank you so much. i want to bring in a fiscal policy reporter, laura montgomery as well as political writer for "the new york times," john harwood. you heard kelly mention some republicans weren't feeling the president's interview on "meet the press" this morning. they took issue with it. from that interview and what you saw
to the internet, we met a few. 16-year-old cristos lives in greece and has taken more than five different computer courses. >> i now know what i want to study at university and what i want to do in my life. >> reporter: 22-year-old from kazakhstan got a job with twitter after taking artificial intelligence. >> you can gain all the top knowledge from a top university. >> reporter: in northern virginia, 14-year-old sophia and her mother, laura, have completed a variety of classes. >> you can sit on your couch in your pjs and learn about any topic that interests you. >> reporter: do you have a sense of what grade you would give yourself? >> probably an a minus. i'm a little rusty. i don't know about you. >> i would give myself an a plus. >> reporter: back at the university of pennsylvania, poetry professor says opening his class has changed his whole feeling about teaching. >> i like it because i get to teach people all over the world. they're self selective. because they're not getting credit at the moment and it's free, they come because they're interested in my topic, which is modern poetry. >> re
with greece. the buyback has gone through. they've raised over 31 million euros -- billion euros at face value. it would appear they had to pay more to get the debt off the u.s. hedge funds and the greek banks and everybody else. therefore they're short by about 450 million euros on their targets. eurozone conference call is about to start with the finance ministers to sort out exactly what they do. in general terms around europe today there is optimism. you'll see that in this close. europe shutting down. >> the european markets are closing now. >> remember yesterday and all that concern we had about where italy might go with the resignation of mario monti. greece is higher. por sh gal is higher. spain is higher. it's a good day for -- investor sentiment.strongly it was revealed today. optimism over what the fed is going to do in the united states tomorrow. optimism there will be a deal on the fiscal cliff. you have optimism that the recapitalization of the banks is going to be delayed by another year according to the bank of italy. and you have optimism as well on mar of election promises as
. but it's not working in greece. i heard a great saying that says when time gets tough, everyone is a keynesian. turn off the tv. not c-span of course. but turn off the news channels that are just cramming this stuff, and get involved in this before you formulate an opinion. i think we would be voted into office smarter, better people that are not tea party extremists. how about if on the democratic side grover norquist had said never cut any spending? i'm going to sign a bill that says never cut and spending. grover norquist, here's a great example, he does not even believe in economic case multipliers. host: gary says -- guest: what's interesting about the last election cycles is we had under president bush and the end, democrats seized control of congress in big numbers. and we had the big democratic sweep with the white house in 2008. 2010, republicans came sweeping back. we've had a pendulum swing, very contractive time period. that's one of the factors. we have seen both sides really dug in because they don't know where the pendulum will swing in the next direction. -- ekle
, it is more important to make all the fiscal cuts them back as greece and spain know, when people do not trust your debt, weak issue too much debt. if everyone heads to the door like china and other is, our debt is really going to go up. host: should the raising of the debt ceiling be tied to these overall conversations or is that too dangerous? you talk about people shied away from your debt. caller: yes. you are going to have a tipping point that people are blind to. since 1847 with popular delusions and the madness of crowds when you get a contagion in there, you do not know what is going to be. people are going to run for the door. it is just stupid. they should have done the tax cuts first and then see if they need to raise taxes. the more sound policy is to cut some savings first to even see if we have to raise taxes. host: here is the statement put out by the white house yesterday. it actually promises to lower rates for the wealthy and sticks the middle class with the bell. bill. susan in pennsylvania, a democratic caller. welcome to the conversation. caller: what i am thinking is the
? greece has been very good at ignoring their debt ceiling and now they have 25% unemployment, 50% youth unemployment. you have young people having to leave the cities to go to the country to engage in subsistence agriculture. so that's what happens when you ignore your debt ceiling. >> gretchen: okay. congressman, i got to wrap it up there. if you actually is to hang your stocking there, i might have to send you some champagne, too. sorry about that. >> please do. >> gretchen: congressman, have a great rest of the day and merry christmas to you. >> thank you. >> gretchen: coming up, news week declares that the war on christmas is over. so is that true? we report. you can decide. then thousands of people about to lose their homes because the government wants to regulate rain. yep. bulldoze the houses and plant a little grass. is that the answer? that's coming up. you can't argue with nutrition you can see. great grains. great grains cereal starts whole and stays whole. see the seam? more pcessed flakes look nothing like natural grains. i'm eating what i kn is better nutrition. mmmm. grea
. >> gretchen: we look at what is happening in greece where they can not print their own money and they have a massive spending problem. you have rioting in the street. so in a way, in america, since you can print the money, it's just kicking the can down the road, right? >> i think people realize intuitively, this can't work forever. the biggest buyer now of our long-term bonds is the federal reserve. in other words, the government itself is printing money to loan to the government. this can only work for some period of time before the rest of the world says, we no longer trust the u.s. dollar. we don't give it the credibility we used to. >> brian: people outside our windows don't trust the u.s. dollar. that's the scary part. >> people have been excited about the rise in home prices. it's just the long-term, this is not how you grow an economy. this is not how you thrive. >> gretchen: all right. you heard it from james freeman, with the "wall street journal." thanks. >> thanks. >> brian: 19 minutes after the hour. >> gretchen: no love for jesus? a jesus look alike tossed right out of a spor
. if not, we will become greece in 20 years. guest: that is a great point to bring up. leaders on both sides of the aisle on capitol hill have made the point that this is not a democratic or republican issue. there is waste to be curbed. what i am hearing from republicans like jon kyl is that you have to make sure america is still able to make its commitments on the world stage. we spoke with a lot of defense- heavy representative, folks from the house armed services committee. they can see that there are cuts to be made. it is just about doing it in a responsible manner rather than across the board cuts, which is less discriminatory than most defense advocates would like. host: we have earl in street louis on our line for democrats. go ahead, =- st. louis on our line for democrats. caller: i was just wondering about the defense industrial complex that president eisenhower made the comment about. the defense contract workers are union workers. i do not hear the republicans hollering about that. i am is retired veteran. i think it is time we cut back on defense programs. we could close
fiscal accounts in balance and move them in the right direction so that we don't become greece? it is interesting that we talk about the -- the previous panel talked about state government and one big problem in europe is there is no fiscal coordination among the independent countries analogous somewhat to our states and who has to bail them out when they haven't done what they are supposed to do? i don't know that we are all that much different. so, we have a great panel. people that are far smarter than i am. i'm going to introduce them now and i will introduce them all and i will sit down and i get to ask some questions. i will ask the panel to keep i will ask the panel to keep their answers
greece they are not a monolithing society. for some people that would be totally impossible to utter a word or a sound. for other people it's cathartic to open up and express their love and devotion and to have the final words over someone they love. i try very much as a pastor not to among their relationships and emotions and how they use to commemorate the person they leaply will have. >> as a reporter i like to get as many information as you can. i want to know every detail about everything and that's a way of processing it, managing it. people must ask you questions you cannot answer. and they say where was god when this happened? >> it's precisely as you is asaid i've tried to avoid answers goesable temporary. there are some things that are handeds now life that we do not know or understand. these areas, ambiguous areas where we don't have a deficit answer it's better not to give any answer at all than to give one inappropriate. that's why we have faith for those things we cannot explain and point to directly, we have to frtrust god and lean on him get through the sufficient tim
a self-induced one because of the fiscal cliff. it's not greece. it's not like the u.s. is being forced to act right now. the u.s. has a medium and long-term problem with entitlements and population. if politicians on both sides of the aisle could get together and kind of do a down payment for the long-term entitlement issue, that would give them the room to not only -- would there be sort of benefits from doing that, but also give them the room to not do so much tightening in the short term when the economy is weak. >> all right, zani, thank you so much. terrific insights. appreciate it. >> my pleasure. >>> well, if you haven't done your christmas shopping yet, now is the time to panic. no, don't panic. our tech expert has some ideas. she'll show you the latest cool gadgets. >>> a look into what's next in the culinary world. cool tools and strong drinks. so we're going to make a drink called the thai basil dhaka re, and we use liquid nitrogen to freeze and crush up herbs. this is thai basil. here is the main part of the technique. pour liquid nitrogen on the herb. liquid nitrogen is go
a year. greece has a debt problem. we have a significant debt problem. martha: indeed. stuart, thank you. >> sure. bill: $16 trillion. now to newtown, connecticut, attempted normalcy and so much heartache. schools in the area opening first time since friday's massacre except of course sandy hook elementary which remains closed indefinitely as police continue their investigation there. there are questions whether it will be ever reopen. volunteers in the neighboring town of monroe, seven miles away, hard at work, getting a former middle school ready for sandy hook students. all of this as the grim task of bearing so many young innocents gets underway. 10:00 in the morning funeral services begin for james mattioli. followed by services for jessica reek coast. -- rekos. a rabbi spoke about that service. >> being celebrated as a pure innocent child by the promise of life ahead of him. who brought joy to his family and to his community and who will be sorely missed. as his older brother said he could have been anything if he had grown up. this is tragedy that we have no answers for this. bill
it do? >> that, that what would happen is, we were turn into europe. we all see it. we see greece, and spain and italy, and france. they all grow slow of the they have extremely high unemployment rates. we would have a slow economy and high unemployment forever if we taxed ourselves like that. gregg: all right. >> this idea that somehow you can't tax the middle class or we won't, it's impossible. if we keep --. gregg: that is a bad idea, right, i get it. i get it. vat. that i get. >> value-added tax is the worst thing. gregg: brian, what is the solution? >> yeah. i, well, if i were king for a day and told to make the economy grow faster, i would cut the size of our federal government. we need to cut spending everywhere because, the best our economy has done in the last 30 years is during the '80s and '90s. that's when ronald reagan and bill clinton cut spending. i would take the clinton tax rates, right now, i would take them. gregg: really. >> they won't hurt the economy, if, i got clinton's spending. he spent one-third less on federal government than barack obama is today, one-t
the country from becoming greece. but i'm not going to set aside the $1.2 trillion in cuts. any hope of going over the fiscal cliff must start in the senate. >> gretchen: a lot of people were upset because members of congress just can't seem to get their act together or the president, depending on which side of the fence that you're on of the they were upset that they went on christmas vacations. the president went to hawaii and members of congress went home. both sides said we're going to come back to washington because we've got to solve the situation. i think what so many people are frustrated about is this is an ongoing situation. it's like every year we come to this point where we're talk being this cliff and this is what i think has angered so many voters and why congress has such a low approval rating. >> rick: they also got to this point because of their last time they did this. it was the last debt creating fight that deleted this thing. now they gave themselves an amount of time to work on it you and thought maybe last week there was a little progress being made. turns out there is
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 62 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (31 Dec 2014)